spelling to communicate

Short story: How Curious

Amelia Jane is a 13-year-old nonspeaking autistic writer. This short piece can be interpreted many ways. What do you think it means?

Real Progress Takes Time, So Don’t Give Up

Rithik Sinhasan is a nonspeaking autistic teen who wants to be a travel writer, but before gaining access to rapid prompting method, or RPM, through Soma Mukhopadhyay, his dreams were grounded.

We are capable and deserving of an education

Chris Finnes is a nonspeaking autistic who was bored with being taught the same simple lessons over and over in a school for students with disabilities. He later met Soma Mukhopadhyay and learned to communicate using RPM. Now, he wants to help others gain access to age-appropriate education.

Nonspeaker Perspectives on Representation

With the help of the International Association of Spelling to Communicate, we asked Nonspeaking Autistic young people what they would like for the world to know about their lived experiences, thoughts, and inner lives.

Trevor Types, a blonde teen with a sharp haircut, stands in front of a background with scissors, hair clippers, and a comb. Image resembles a magazine advertisement

Put Down the Scissors

After gaining access to communicate his thoughts through typing, one of Trevor’s first requests was for a cool haircut. And it was great. But sometimes, Trevor has trouble getting his mind and body to work in sync.

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