• Côtoyer les « parents autisme »

    Lorsque quelqu’un de la com­mu­nauté des autistes ren­contre un parent dont l’enfant vient de recevoir son diag­nostic d’autisme, il s’agit d’un point cri­tique. Il n’est pas néces­saire d’être autiste pour avoir à cœur les intérêts des autistes. Le fait d’être autiste né le garantit pas non plus.

  • The Unintentional Bully

    Unintentional Bullies

    Bullying is gen­er­ally thought of as an inten­tional behavior, but not under­standing autistic people can lead to unin­ten­tional bul­lying.

  • Friends are doing a toast on a rooftop. The autistic friend here would not be having a drink because he is a recovering addict.

    ‘Fitting in’ and Other Issues with Being an Autistic Addict in Recovery

    When you’re autistic, it’s easy to begin to lean on alcohol or drugs to help buffer the sen­sory and social anx­iety of group out­ings. David Gray-Hammond on being autistic and a recov­ered addict.

  • Trichotillomania: When Stimming Turns Self-Injurious

    One day, she saw a curly hair among what was oth­er­wise straight. And she plucked it. That was the start of years of pulling out her own hair and before her autism diag­nosis.

  • The Most Painful Expression of Love

    Grief is the most painful expres­sion of love.
Let us expe­ri­ence that pain in our own way.
Normalize the honest and raw expres­sion of autistic love.

  • College: The Highs and Lows For An Autistic Student

    One autistic col­lege stu­dent found out the hard way that col­lege was not what he had expected, and nav­i­gating the social ter­rain was a clumsy journey.

Lorsque quelqu’un de la communauté des autistes rencontre un parent dont l’enfant vient de recevoir son diagnostic d’autisme, il s’agit d’un point critique. Il n’est pas nécessaire d’être autiste pour avoir à cœur les intérêts des autistes. Le fait d’être autiste ne le garantit pas non plus.