Recent Stories

Understanding human collective behaviour

If I would have had access to some magical time machine for procuring books when I was a teenager, it would have spared me many surprises, and I might have been able to avoid a few detours on my journey through life to date.

A Typer’s Freedom Dance

Anantha Krishnamurthy comes through with an onomatopoeic journey of triumph, tapping resonating to thunderous thudding freedom.

Autistic people and the fear of death

David Gray-Hammond links the systemic factors that contribute autistic insomnia to the pervasive fear of death many of us experience.

Want to keep up with our latest stories?

Get weekly updates on all NeuroClastic’s stories

More Stories

Poetry: The Nest

Nonspeaking poet Amelia Jane longs for her voice to be heard. Her winged thoughts perch on the mind and sing of triumph.

A new poem: I’m Rightly Rogue

Nonspeaking poet Noah McSweeny muses on having the words, having the interest, wanting to connect, and wishing his tongue would obey his mind.

Poetry: Anonymous

Anantha Krishnamurthy’s mind is a symphony and his body is a sound cage. This powerful poem is itself a beautiful triumph of sheer Will.

The continuously shifting justifications for pathologising non-conformists

Following the trail of where Hans Asperger picked up the term autism I ended up reading a fascinating 1919 German book by Eugen Bleuler titled ‘Autistic and undisciplined thinking in medicine, and how to overcome it’. The content is not at all what you would think. The sands of pathologisation have shifted significantly.

Poetry: The Nest

Nonspeaking poet Amelia Jane longs for her voice to be heard. Her winged thoughts perch on the mind and sing of triumph.

A new poem: I’m Rightly Rogue

Nonspeaking poet Noah McSweeny muses on having the words, having the interest, wanting to connect, and wishing his tongue would obey his mind.

Poetry: Anonymous

Anantha Krishnamurthy’s mind is a symphony and his body is a sound cage. This powerful poem is itself a beautiful triumph of sheer Will.

The continuously shifting justifications for pathologising non-conformists

Following the trail of where Hans Asperger picked up the term autism I ended up reading a fascinating 1919 German book by Eugen Bleuler titled ‘Autistic and undisciplined thinking in medicine, and how to overcome it’. The content is not at all what you would think. The sands of pathologisation have shifted significantly.

Questioning if you could be autistic or otherwise neurodivergent?

We compiled a directory of specialists trained to diagnose autism in adults, organized by city.

Skip to content