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The Autism Spectrum According to Autistic People

Autism neurodiversity

Autism and Having Sex

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I’m an autistic woman in a stable, mostly healthy marriage. I think our problems are minor compared to other people’s problems. But somebody needs to talk about autism and having sex. I guess that would be me.

Content notice: this is probably going to get weird.

Editor’s note: This article was published by a user with an anonymous profile; however, the editor forgot to change the author before publishing. If you are an email subscriber, please note the author of this piece is Dynamite Garden.

Editor’s content notice: this article covers uncomfortable topics related to intimacy, masking, sex, coercion, sensory processing disorder, and difficulty communicating boundaries.

If I’m being honest, my sex life has tanked, moving from disappointing to disastrous.

I’m the one who realizes it’s disastrous, though, because I’m the one experiencing the disaster.

Words Mean Different Things to Me

My partner and I are very different when it comes to our personal needs. Our sensory profiles are polar opposite. I notice everything, feel everything, see everything, smell everything, taste everything, and all of that input is overwhelming at any time.

He notices very little external. He’s wholly consumed by what’s going on inside his head and body. For him, this is great. He can control what he senses and feels, to a degree, and is not as perpetually overwhelmed as me.

My sensory profile makes sex difficult. It doesn’t have to be, but another human is involved who is “normal” in the sexual arena. That makes this a social experience, and those don’t tend to go in my favor.

Noticing All the Things

Even if someone has brushed their teeth, I can smell the contents of their stomach churning. I can smell the inside of their nose. I can smell everything. I smell my body and yours, and the wall of scents swirl and close in on me, barricading me inside this invisible claustrophobic restraint.

When someone kisses my skin, hovers right over my face, breathes onto me, I’m awash in an empathetic intimacy overload and the fumes of bile and acid indigestion tinged with the mint of toothpaste.

They’ve left a slimy wet film of it on my forehead when they kissed it gingerly, and I panic because I want to throw them off and run away. The need to wipe it off is visceral and uncontrollable, but I’ll seem like a jerk because it’s not “normal” for me to feel this way.

But to me, for the intensity of the experience, they may as well have just emptied the juice from the bottom of a trash bag onto my face and neck.

Instead, I lie there and take it. I let that slime slick just fester on my forehead so that I can think of nothing else but that and the breath spiced with garlic, acid, and beer leading an uprising against my olfactory nerve.

I already know that my feelings are not typical– not even for someone with the sexual trauma I’ve experienced.

Eager hands grope and search, grope and search, the pressure not deep enough to keep me from feeling the insufferable intensity of electrified nerve endings burning through my fascia. Those hands travel over the spots that activate every insecurity and trauma association I have. Fingertips glide across my too-soft stomach, and I jerk and bat the offending hand away.

Every insecurity and shame I have is awakened. Like soldiers, they elbow their way to the forefront of my consciousness to report for duty. I’m supposed to be in the throes of passion, but I’m just being crushed by degradation and self-hate. The prying fingers move on and pause on a scar.

I notice everything.

My mask is so solid that I’m still appearing to be enjoying myself.

The exploration of my body graduates from fingers to mouth. Wiry beard pokes through my shirt, clings to my hair, debrides my neck. It is a million June bug legs, gripping and lifting, gripping and lifting.

I feel every micrometer of my skin like I live in five thousand bodies that are all communicating at once in screams and shrieks and languages I don’t speak.

The sensation remains even after my partner has moved on, a fire smouldering just under my skin.

The mouth sounds echo and reverberate through my head like a sadistic synesthetic ping pong ball lighting up every cortex of my short-circuiting brain. Why these noises bother me so much, I don’t know.

Wait Until Tomorrow

Always and without fail, my partner has a very obvious play when he wants to have sex. He starts by climbing in the bed and talking to me, which is not a huge part of our typical routine. It’s small talk coupled with cuddling, and those two things do not register very high on my sexual arousal meter.

I’m afraid he’s going to ask for sex, and I’m not ready for that. My day has been filled with overwhelm, I’m touched out, and I’m light years away from being in the headspace to have sex.

And almost every time, I ask him to wait until tomorrow. He doesn’t get it, and I don’t tell him. He doesn’t want to wait. He’s not mean about, and he’s willing to take the most minimal effort as a concession prize. “Give me a hand?” he pleads.

“If we do it tonight, then I’ll last longer tomorrow,” he promises. That’s not a selling point for me, at all. The conditions I need to be able to have– and enjoy– sex do not involve the promise of longer sex.

I don’t want to give a hand job. I don’t want to give a blow job. I don’t even want to watch and cheer.

What I want is a mutually-enjoyable experience, but I can’t get there this way. I mean, his drive is higher than mine, and he’s more flexible. I do try to accommodate him when it’s been a while, even if I’m not in the mood. He tries to coerce the mood, giving his best effort. This usually involves kissing, massage, licking, groping, whatever most people do when they are trying to inspire the mood.

It just doesn’t work for me, though. Maybe like two out of every five hundred attempts, but he thinks it’s worth the effort. What he doesn’t know is that it distresses me.

I try to weather the sensory tornado whipping into a welter inside me, the chaotic cacophony of sensory processing becomes sensory protesting.

He keeps begging, negotiating. He’s happy with anything and doesn’t complain, but I don’t want to do anything but to wait until tomorrow.

The unspoken truth is that I’m always the one who says no. I’m always the one who spoils it. I’m not spontaneous enough. I’m weird.

A few times, but rarely, he has expressed being hurt by my rejections. I’m terrified of that. I am very attracted to him, I love him, but sex is not casual to me like it is him, and I cannot get there quickly. I do not want to reject him, though, because that is an important part of expressing love and connection for him.

“Please, tomorrow.”

He will ask again, offer to just do it himself. He wants to kiss, but anything besides waiting until tomorrow will be too much for me. And, I won’t want it tomorrow because of tonight.

I feel like I’m not worth the wait. He never would say that, and he’s not thinking that, but that’s the message I receive in the moment. I’m feel like a slab of meat with no preferences or desires.

But it will take a long time for me to recover from my self-loathing and the unexpressed anger that I’m feeling.

Losing by Losing Harder

I start trying to explain myself, again. I’m feeling forced into explaining my autistic brain, again. There’s nothing less sexy than pathologizing my own sexual behavior and desire by detailing my rigidity, sensory sensitivities, and oddities, again. Autism and neuroscience make great pillow talk…

And now I’m that person who talks too much, again. I hate talking.

However it happens, it happens with no grace or style or excitement. I perform a duty under duress, or he takes care of himself, and I fake enthusiasm because I feel guilty for being so weird and difficult. He finishes and thanks me and tells me he loves me, then goes right to sleep.

Not me. My skin is still burning. It won’t stop. I rub and rub at those places so hard that they’re left raw. I’m trying to erase the feeling. It’s still there.

I stand up, walk around, pace. The sleep medications I had taken have passed their window of being effective. Now they’re just enough to make my restless legs jump.

I’m trying to outpace this meltdown. I rifle through the medicine cabinet, swearing at my conservative psychiatrist who sees my stress as if it is other people’s stress.

It’s not. I need elephant tranquilizers right now and he wants to give me something like Benadryl.

But this feeling won’t leave my skin. It grows roots under my flesh and spreads, a wildfire devastating my psychic ecosystem. I feel like some deranged character from Edgar Allan Poe’s discard pile.

Headphones would help, but I don’t remember them until the next day when I go to write about this disaster in an article. I can’t think of anything that will help.

He’s sleeping like a rock, and the pinnacle of my problem solving skills is the redundant refrain of contemplating dousing myself with gasoline. Tomorrow, I will wake up embattled and face the day starting with nothing to give.

Either the meltdown comes, or I’ve obliterated myself trying to externalize the sensations enough to control them… by self harming, or self medicating, or self loathing myself into a catatonic state.

If he had only waited until tomorrow…

It takes me a long time to be ready for sex. The dopamine flood of a new relationship made this easier to navigate, but that faded with time as it does with all long-term relationships.

Eventually, I had to go back to navigating my defiant neurology like a research scientist fumbling through trial-and-error or a high-stakes gambler betting the house on my ability to make it to the end without showing all my autism cards.

I am not asexual. I actually really enjoy sex, but only under the right conditions. These can be highly specific, and they always require time.

I have to have time. I have to prepare in advance, mentally. It’s takes a conscious effort to coordinate and rearrange my neural ruts so that I can be in the right gear. I can’t travel to places without first laying tracks.

It’s like I have to visualize a path to sexual desire, like a cosmic ribbon weaving itself in different directions, tying together each disparate cortex of my brain needed to make sex happen.

Then I’m ready.

If I can get there, I’m very ready. When it happens that way, I imagine what I experience is better than what most people experience.

Sex Isn’t Sex to Me

For me, it takes a lot of intellectual stimulation to want sex. Sex isn’t sex in my fantasy life, but a lot of converging energies and sensations that come from this volley of innuendo, metaphors buried deep in lyrics and poetry, and a building crescendo of anticipation.

The sex, at least, is not the fun part.

If he had waited until tomorrow, I would have started the process of preparing right then. I would have felt honored and respected and worth the wait, my feelings valued more than his physical gratification. That claustrophobic feeling of being coerced would’ve left me.

I would probably would have made it harder for him, no pun intended. Maybe that’s a little mean. Using explicit language whispered in his ear, I would’ve made a promise about the plans I had for the next day. He would’ve squirmed and groaned— and maybe it would have taken three minutes to fall asleep as opposed to his customary ten seconds.

And I would’ve spent an hour or two or three thinking about the next day and planning it, writing a script in my head.

Scripts for Sex

Yes, I’m aware that scripted sex might seem boring to most people. It’s a very autistic thing, sure.

But I’m a really good writer.

And to be frank, most of you approach sex with the finesse of an overzealous Saint Bernard. Your sloppy paw placement, profuse slobbering, aggressive panting, and lack of attention to detail is a hostile sensory assault.

Ideally, this wouldn’t be a one day event. The anticipation would build over the course of several days. There would be veiled text messages sent through the day while he was at work, thoughtfully placed and timed promises that almost seem like delicious threats, metaphors, massages without happy endings, until the anticipation grew to the point of delirium.

But, I could have made a lot of progress to that end in a day. It wouldn’t have been worthy of a chapter in some pop guru’s tantric sexual dynamics book, but it would’ve been better than a reluctant hand job– for both of us.

Prep also would mean that I did or did not do things that would kill the mood.

I could have avoided the foods and activities that cause me to feel sluggish or overwhelmed, taken time for self care, curated my playlist (songs and moves), timed my shower, worn something other than my most ragged underwear and sweatpants, tidied up the room, shaved my legs, held off on my sleep meds, and could have spent the time daydreaming about what might leave both of us reeling.

Consent is important. Your autistic partner might not get even your most fervent hints. They might see soft hints as an invitation to negotiate and not a hard “no.” And you might have a hard time saying “no.”

It’s important to have these conversations first, before anything happens. Many autistic people may go mute during sex, whether it’s really good or it’s really bad.

Work out some signal or stop point that works for both of you, and respect that instantly. Work out a secondary “slow down” point, or a “don’t do that specific thing but keep going” signal.

Because without question, “taking one for the team” is not a good strategy. The more times you go along with it because you want to please your partner, the more you will associate sex negatively and the harder it will be to get back to a place where sex is mutually gratifying.

A Note on Sex

I keep using the word sex, but what I mean is sexual activity. This can take infinite forms.

Hacks for Successful Sex with an Autistic Person

This isn’t my realm of expertise, so try these suggestions if they seem like they will work for you. If you– or your partner, if you’re looking to accommodate someone else– don’t have a similar sensory profile to mine, this won’t be that helpful.

Maybe someone else with very different needs can write an article with sex hacks for a different sensory profile.

1. It should take a long time.

Carve out some time, one or two hours. Approach touch a body part at a time. Start in a neutral location, like the calves or feet. Build. Don’t go straight for the genitals or most sensitive areas, but dance around them for a long time. Get close to them and move on. What you’re doing is building sensory pleasure pathways. Rushing in may be too intense, or they may not be able to enjoy it in the moment.

Don’t conceive of the foreplay a sense of duty to be fulfilled. It is a necessity to help your partner enjoy every sensory experience you have to offer.

Take as much time as is needed to make sure you are both desperate with desire before you go all in.

2. Dial it back.

Don’t insist that you are both doing all the things to each other at the same time. That’s overloading the circuits.

Even if they enjoy it, or can tolerate it in the moment, they might be up all night, suffering with overstimulation after it’s over. We can’t see and hear and feel and touch and taste and move with purpose all at once.

If we try, it’s an act. You don’t want to put on a brave face and just suffer through it out of a sense of guilt for not being a normal lover.

3. Build the soundscape.

To set the scene, there needs to be pacing without talking about pacing. You can do this with a curated playlist and a Bluetooth speaker. This will build a rhythm that grows and swells and pulsates.

The music sets a motif and has the added benefit of drowning out the libido-destroying mouth sounds that are imminent.

4. Control the scentscape.

Another sensory hack is candy. I personally like peppermint or cinnamon Altoids. These are extremely strong and have a mild analgesic effect. The peppermint oil can cause the brain to believe the skin is cold (or hot, with cinnamon), and it is somewhat numbing. They were originally marketed as a “stomach calmative.”

So, yes, Altoids. No more burning skin, no more smell of indigestion (or anything other than mint), and the scentscape has been righted.

5. Go with what’s familiar when arranging the setting.

Don’t just try something new in the moment when you’re arranging the setting. If you put new sheets on the bed, they might end up being a texture you hate. New fancy underwear might be tolerable at first, but once overstimulation sets in, they might become unbearable.

Don’t set your playlist to random or use the radio feature. You might end up with a new song, and either 100% of your brainpower is invested in hearing, or in feeling. You want to conserve processing resources.

If you’re processing auditory input that is unfamiliar, anything happening to your body is like someone pecking insistently on your shoulder while you’re trying to read an essay. You can either read, or attend to their concerns. You can’t divest your brain power to do both.

New scents, new tastes, new clothes, new anything may end up taking the center sensory stage over the focus that needs to be on what your body is experiencing.

If music isn’t your thing, you could wear ear defenders. A blindfold would also help to cut down on overstimulation, but that requires a lot of trust in your partner.

6. Know your intimacy empathy threshold.

Eye contact can be so intimate that it’s like staring into the sun with naked eyes. Sex can be like eye contact while sitting naked on the sun.

If you or your partner has a low intimacy empathy threshold, then that PG-13, missionary style, staring-lovingly-into-each-other’s-eyes, gentle lovemaking shit is not for you.

You’re going to need to depersonalize the experience (more on that below).

If you need more of the emotional connection, then you’re the opposite end of my sensory world and probably can get more useful advice from reading Cosmopolitan magazines. Sorry.

7. Depersonalize.

Intense intimacy empathy can be overwhelming. Extremely. If the thought of your partner hovering overall you, gazing longingly into your eyes, kissing you gently and deeply, whispering sweet nothings about their love for you fills you with more terror than going to the dentist for a root canal, then maybe you have too much intimacy empathy.

So instead, go to the dentist.

Or the doctor. The masseuse. Call a repair or maintenance technician. To be clear, I’m talking about role play. Here’s where a script can come in handy and some cognitive and creative effort in advance.

Yes, I mean a literal script. It doesn’t have to be followed to the letter or even written down, but it can give your partner with different intimacy thresholds an idea about how to give you the pleasure you’re seeking without needing to be intuitive about something that isn’t natural to them.

Choose a role that’s comfortable to them and attractive to you. You’re autistic, and if you have sensory issues with touch and intimacy, your brain has likely found other ways to be sexually attracted outside of what is typically considered sexy.

I’m most attracted to my partner when he’s fixing things or reading a book. He’s a deep thinker and a mechanical whiz who can fix lots of things, and those are sexy traits to me.

So, you might “call a repair man” or even just ask your partner about a book they’re reading.

Autistic people tend to hate surprises. That’s a big processing load all at once, and they like to plan ahead. Talking about ideas and getting in character in advance might help.

8. Power Imbalance.

Another way to depersonalize intimacy to work around empathy overwhelm is to give your sexual vignette a power imbalance.

If this is going to happen, it needs to be discussed in advance to make sure that both partners understand limits and boundaries and how to stop or slow things down.

A power imbalance doesn’t have to mean a full BDSM session with a leather-clad dominatrix carrying a whip, but can take more subtle forms. Roleplay wherein one person is an authority figure, like a professor, a boss, a manager, etc. can be a much less intense differential.

A power imbalance can help overcome choice paralysis, too. Autistic people, ADHD people, and people with PTSD may experience choice paralysis in life, generally, and moreso in the bedroom. This can mean that they are insecure about what they are supposed to be doing and therefore do nothing.

Handcuffs, being told not to move, or using other types of restraints may remove the burden of choice and help with intimacy empathy overwhelm; conversely, they may want to take charge. If the partner is restrained and blindfolded, the overstimulation (or even threat of it) from eye contact, wayward hands or mouths, or other overstimulating encroachment is reduced.

9. Study each other.

You might not know what you like or what your partner likes or would be open to doing, but there’s an app for that. Several, actually. Kindu is a couple’s app that has lots of questions that range from the most vanilla (holding hands) to the fetish end of X-rated.

You simply answer questions with a heart for yes, maybe for “open to try,” or an x for “not even on your birthday.” You can write your own questions, and your partner will not know if the questions came from you. It will only show your partner your matches.

This article lists other apps that can help you explore and broaden your sexual repertoire with your partner.

The Rundown, for Partners

Sex is not like fast food for everyone. Some people might be that flexible and available 24/7, but many aren’t–autistic or not. A partner is not a menu with a choice of Big Mac or McRib that you can have within minutes for minimal investment. That might have been how it worked early in the relationship, but that’s not sustainable.

Life is complex and overwhelming, and it takes work to maintenance a relationship. If your partner is masking through sex to keep you happy, they won’t be able to maintain that mask forever. It’s going to make sex a traumatic experience for them.

It’s easy to blame the person with sensory issues for not being able to produce like McDonald’s, but you’re lying to yourself if you act like the only options are McDonald’s or starvation.

You can wait a day or a few days for your partner. You can invest in them outside of the bedroom to help them be ready to enjoy sex. You can spend time with them and help to build the anticipation and allow that part to be mutual.

You can help to manage their emotions and sense of worth so that they feel like you genuinely respect them and their body and mind as it is.

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13 Responses

  1. I was married for ten years. I always felt that sex was something that someone else did. I was a loving husband, but for me sex was a mechanical experience. I enjoyed the release to be sure, but my goal was always to make her feel better, because I always felt like I wasn’t myself when I was having sex (like the author, I include any number of acts under that rubric). I always felt better when she would tell sexy stories, because then she and I could be in the same out of body experience together. It got a bit boring when the stories were repetitive. It’s also possible that as our fights became more frequent and sex became less frequent, I grew to live without it. In short, this piece really speaks to me.

    1. Yes, the storytelling is the part that feels like connection, that is exciting and maybe even in some way transcendent. Mechanical sounds about right. I feel guilty about it, because I was not like this when we first got together. I thought that I had found a “healing love,” but I’d really found a healing dopamine and oxytocin rush that was a temporary balm on my sensory issues.

  2. You are expressing yourself well and your partner is *choosing* to ignore your feelings and push your boundaries. I’ve . . . been there. It’s not that he doesn’t understand, he just doesn’t think your feelings matter like his do. As an autistic woman, this was really difficult for me to understand. I always thought that it was me, and if I could just learn to communicate my feelings and boundaries properly, some NT person who is supposed to love or care about me would engage with my feelings in good faith, because I am *always* operating in good faith etc –
    It can take us a while to see when someone we love is, fundamentally, NOT, operating in good faith.
    You are being clear, and he is being clear that he sees your feelings and boundaries and things to be negotiated.
    And now I’m going to be clear:
    That is abusive.
    It will not be confined to sex, because it is a baseline unwillingness to respect you and to see you as just as much of a person as he is.
    It’s not ok, and it’s not just about this one thing. It will be about anything that you need, if it conflicts with his wants
    Please find a way out.

    1. Completely agree with Rachel. You shouldn’t have to go through that! Unless they genuinely have no idea that it’s affecting you to such an extent, someone that truly loves and values you wouldn’t want you to suffer like that.

  3. I have to say that my thoughts were the same like Rachels when reading this. You’re not wrong about anything, your desires matter. Probably sapiosexual. Been through similar experiences and heard so many similar stories by autistic women.
    Please love yourself deeper and let nothing be done to you and your body which feels wring to you.

    Thank you so much for writing this article!

  4. I agree with the above three comments. I was shocked to read this because it sounds like a painfully intimate description of sexual abuse (emotionally coercing someone into “sexual activity” that makes them go through hell – what else to call this?). Frankly I think the article should have a trigger warning (about abuse), because as I opened it I expected advice on meeting sensory needs but was not prepared for reading such painful content.

    I think what you describe really goes far beyond pure sensory discomfort and fully into the territory of sexual violation and coercion.

    I think it was extremely courageous of you to publish this article and it’s not really on me to comment on things like the author’s relationships etc., but I was really shaken to read the beginning of the article and get the sense that the author accepts as ordinary (or at least not totally outrageous) this level of both psychological boundary violation from a partner (it might be unconscious and/or culturally sanctioned, but it’s still clearly abuse and has to be flagged as such) plus the heart-wrenching suffering inflicted by self-coercion. I would say, really put a trigger warning on this one and mention that it talks – also – about sexual abuse and the consequences of sexual abuse (like accepting more of it without realising). Really a lot of complex and deep topics far beyond sensory needs, like sexual and psychological boundaries, gender (are women frequently conditioned to feel obliged to accept boundary violation and coercion, for cultural reasons (rape culture), and how does this differ for men), PTSD, different sexualities (like sapiosexual mentioned above, asexual, there is probably more), and the whole topic around consent is really far wider and deeper, might also include e.g. consensually non-monogamous relationship structures where the partners really have different needs, etc.

    Also perhaps worth emphasising strongly that nobody (autistic or not, of whatever sexuality or relationships status) has the obligation to trick or coerce themselves into sex (at all) in the name of “normal.” Our psychophysical integrity is not worth this.

  5. I agree with the above three comments. I was shocked to read this because it sounds like a painfully intimate description of sexual abuse (emotionally coercing someone into “sexual activity” that makes them go through hell – what else to call this?). Frankly I think the article should have a trigger warning (about abuse), because as I opened it I expected advice on meeting sensory needs but was not prepared for reading such painful content.

    I think what you describe really goes far beyond pure sensory discomfort and fully into the territory of sexual violation and coercion.

    I think it was extremely courageous of you to publish this article and it’s not on me to comment things like the author’s relationships etc., but I was really shaken to read the beginning of the article and get the sense that the author accepts as ordinary (or at least not totally outrageous) this level of both psychological boundary violation from a partner (it might be unconscious and/or culturally sanctioned, but it’s still clearly abuse and has to be flagged as such), plus the heart-wrenching suffering inflicted by self-coercion.

    I would say, really put a trigger warning on this one and mention that it talks – also – about sexual abuse and the consequences of sexual abuse (like accepting more extreme boundary violation without realising). Really a lot of complex and deep topics far beyond sensory needs, like sexual and psychological boundaries, gender (are women frequently conditioned to feel obliged to accept boundary violation and coercion, for cultural reasons (rape culture), and how does this differ for men), PTSD, different sexualities (like sapiosexual mentioned above, asexual, there is probably more), and the whole topic around consent is complex (might also include e.g. consensually non-monogamous relationship structures where the partners really have different needs, etc.).

    Also worth emphasising strongly that nobody (autistic or not, of whatever sexuality or relationships status) has the obligation to trick or coerce themselves into sex (at all) in the name of “normal.” Our psychophysical integrity is not worth this.

  6. Seconding everyone in the comments, it shouldn’t be this much of a strife to have your needs met no matter how inside or outside the “norm” they are, and your partner shouldn’t make you feel guilty for having boundaries and alternatives. In fact, it’s alarming how people bend over backwards to try to match a reality instead of taking it at face value (especially in sex), but your partner isn’t even trying and is placing unreasonable demands on you.

    (Not to mention how we autistic people often are made to feel that our boundaries don’t matter because they’re too “odd” in communication itself, not just on sex. Masking ensues.)

    The dominant narrative about sex is lacking on the many layers you describe and it limits opportunities to meet people because there is one way to have it that is prized over others. I feel that in sex education the concept of “having sexual baggage of any kind” should be more explored, the conversations are overwhelmingly about “fixing these problems” instead of meeting someone where they actually are and it’s a disservice. If we approached sex without feeling the need to fulfill a standard, there should be less need to mask.

    Thank you for writing this.

  7. I think I might cry. To find such a vivid and thorough description of what I go through when having sex means so much. I’m not alone in the dread of seeing those signals and knowing I’m going to say no. I’m not alone in that strange guilt of rejecting something I have every right to reject. I go mute during sex and feel like I’m trapped in my head, unable to get what I want or express what I need. The idea of a script and signals is so good. Thank you so much for writing this.

  8. What is really concerning to me is the seeming inability to discuss any of this with your partner. Most of the comments so far have been around how the partner is awful and abusive etc, but it seems to me people are completely missing the fact that the author has stated many times in here that they’ve not actually told him ANY of this. Other than them always saying ‘can it wait’ – it seems none of these things are actually known to him. I can’t imagine how it would feel to find out after so long that you’d had these feelings all along and not trusted him with them. I feel like that is the first issue to overcome – the trust.

    Why is there a lack of trust there and does it have to do with HIS behaviour or just the author’s need to mask to seem ‘normal’. I am autistic with ADHD, a history of sexual trauma, c-ptsd, and ptsd, and I know what it’s like to be in this situation so I’m not just crowing to ‘see both sides’ here. I’ve been on both sides of this in my lifetime and yeah, the concerning part to me was the amount the partner doesn’t know. I feel like that has to be the first step in ANY sexual relationship is talking about sensory things, about what is good and what isn’t, about what sort of things we each need/want. And no, it’s not easy, it took my husband and I years into our marriage to break down all our walls and at that point, we realized we just weren’t sexually compatible. But working on trust has to come first before anything else. ND or NT. I hope the author can work on this with their partner and find a way through that is pleasurable and happy-making for both of them.

    With that aside, I’m sharing this article with the other autistics I know. Some really good tips and suggestions in here.

  9. Whoa. I have some sensory problems and this so perfectly explains it. I can’t claim to have the same level of bodily awareness as what you describe, but I have so much respect for how you approach and describe it. Wow.

    Describing the overzealous behavior as a St. Bernard… excellent.

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