greta thunberg

Supporting Greta Is Great, But It’s Not Enough2 min read

If you are an allistic person who claims to be an ally to autistic people, you should cel­e­brate Greta Thunberg becoming TIME Magazine’s Person of the Year. You should use the priv­i­lege you have because of the way social com­mu­ni­ca­tion favors your neu­rotype to defend her against ableist insults.

But, you should still sup­port other autistic people, even if they cannot do what she did. It is impor­tant to remember that Greta’s award as Person of the Year is con­tin­gent on allistic people’s approval.

As long as society is con­structed against us, some of us will never have access to the kind of suc­cess Greta Thunberg has, and you should show just as much sup­port to those autistic people who are not standing in the global spot­light.

Support those who cannot do what Greta did because they are unable to speak in ways that neu­rotyp­i­cals find pleasant, or because they do not speak orally at all.

Support those who live in poverty and have to take a job when they are Greta’s age or younger to keep their family alive and don’t have the priv­i­lege to travel the world.

Support those whose voices are mar­gin­al­ized because of racism, and remember that as won­derful as Greta is, she is still a white person born in one of the wealth­iest coun­tries in the world. She has never expe­ri­enced racism, colo­nialism, or geno­cide.

Remember that autistic people have been doing what Greta is doing for cen­turies— bucking the status quo— and it has often resulted in them being stoned, burned at the stake, cru­ci­fied, exiled, jailed, beaten, and enslaved. The dif­fer­ence is not in any­thing Greta is doing dif­fer­ently from other autis­tics, but in how non-autistics are receiving her.

Support those of us who have phys­ical ill­nesses that would pre­vent us from trav­eling and engaging in public activism.

Support those of us whose fam­i­lies do not accept us as Greta’s family accepted her for who she is.

And above all, sup­port all autistic people who for what­ever reason, are not what allis­tics define as “pro­duc­tive.” Greta’s activism does serve a pro­duc­tive end for allistic people – con­vincing the world to take action on cli­mate change. That is a good goal, and I really hope she suc­ceeds in it, for the sake of humanity’s future sur­vival.

But it is still a pro­duc­tive end that allis­tics deem valu­able. Autistics don’t have to pro­duce in order to be valu­able. When you listen to autistic suc­cess sto­ries, con­tinue to cel­e­brate them, but know that suc­cess is not a pre­con­di­tion for human dig­nity, which we deserve as much as you do.

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9 Comments

  1. Absolutely, I am sure Greta her­self is against all the lion­ising, whereas she only wants action, that people would do some­thing instead of putting her on a pedestal. Neurotipical neu­rology sup­ports drama,our autistic neu­rology prefers peace. Each and every person on this Planet has the right to live hap­pily in abun­dance. We have the intel­li­gence to create our world, so why not create a better one. That is merely what Greta wants, so do I.

  2. Greta and the Planet would be much hap­pier if those who work at Time mag­a­zine would have turned vegan instead of giving an award.It is nice of course the award, but as Greta and myself too saying we don’t need heroes or celebs, we just need a liv­able Planet. It is not about Greta, please notice that, it is about our Home, the Earth.


  3. I agree with this article and think that Greta would agree too. Neurotypical society values fame and celebrity and believes that if someone goes public about an issue it’s just for fame and celebrity. This doesn’t mean everyone values fame and celebrity. All Greta wants is for world leaders to stop being greedy and do some­thing about cli­mate change. Not everyone desires fame and celebrity, neu­rotyp­i­cals.

  4. “It is impor­tant to remember that Greta’s award as Person of the Year is con­tin­gent on allistic people’s approval.”
    With that in mind, per­haps we should con­sider also having our own autistic/asperger Person of the Year award that will not depend on allistic approval. How about it? Any ideas on that wel­come!

    1. There are already so many celebs. Greta and I myself along with others are doing our best to get equally secure posi­tion to anyone, get humanity out of the sur­vival level. What is Greta doing is not about her­self, it is about the ani­mals, our environment,our Home this Planet. Greta is not accepting any of her awards because that is what neu­rotipi­cals do instead of taking action, they give out awards, make a big fuss around things so noone has to do anything.Greta wants people to take action. For the likes of Greta, the best award would be if people on Earth turned vegan, or they would stop using so much plastic, or all the houses were off-grid, all the cars elec­tric etc.. I would like to have that too. Enough silly awards, more action and more safety and secu­rity for people regard­less they can sing very well or not, or they are famous or not. I, as an austistic don’t under­stand why people who are famous get more money? We humans, have extra­or­di­nary intel­li­gence but it is used to make weapons, to create unfair sys­tems. We can, all and each of us can live an abun­dant life, we can create it, once we gain that con­scious­ness. 🙂

  5. I have had a number of blogs on and off on this present oper­ating word­press account. The page that you are looking at was deleted, oh maybe a year ago. It is under con­struc­tion with new and improved safe­guards and focus.
    Presently I have others under var­ious pseu­do­nyms. The one you speak of was lastly a site ded­i­cated to poetry but alas inter­neters can’t behave and one is con­stantly ripped off. Or abused by drive by com­menters who really have nothing to say but, can’t help typing for some fucking reason.
    Speaking of rea­sons did you have a point, or were you just prone to burping out somey­thing of illogical.…because you live in a thought form.

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